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  1. Ghetto definition, a section of a city, especially a thickly populated slum area, inhabited predominantly by members of an ethnic or other minority group, often as a result of social or economic restrictions, pressures, or hardships. See more.
  2. Jun 29,  · But I was Micheal from the ghetto — used to scoring goals with a plastic bag. Columbia would do. Life was not straightforward, though. Winters were long, and when other kids would go home for holidays I was stuck in my dorm because I had no money to travel. And everyone in America is not like Mr. Davies, I found out.
  3. Apr 27,  · Ghetto, in slang usage, has entirely lost the sense of forced segregation — the meaning it held for centuries. In a rapid about-face, it's become an indictment of individual choices.
  4. In Making the Second Ghetto, Arnold Hirsch argues that in the post-depression years Chicago was a "pioneer in developing concepts and devices" for housing segregation. Hirsch shows that the legal framework for the national urban renewal effort was forged in the heat generated by the racial struggles waged on Chicago’s South Side. His chronicle of the strategies used by ethnic, political, and.
  5. A large, portable, radio cassette player, measuring about m wide and m high. It is played especially outdoors, in public places at loud volume; and carried on one shoulder with loudspeakers facing the head. It is assumed that bypassers share the same musical taste.
  6. Space Ghetto Hosting Fund. I upgraded us to our own cloud server so we can hopefully see the last of memory problems but it's doubled our hosting costs. Got a few spare coins? I'd appreciate the help and every dime goes to keeping the Ghetto erect! Peace, Garciuh. Search for: Search.
  7. Ghetto definition is - a quarter of a city in which Jews were formerly required to live. How to use ghetto in a sentence. Did You Know?
  8. Few words are as ideologically charged as ghetto, a term that has described legally segregated Jewish quarters, dense immigrant enclaves, Nazi holding pens, and black neighborhoods in the United States. Daniel B. Schwartz reveals how the history of ghettos is tied up with struggle and argument over the slippery meaning of a word.

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